About Us

Save the Children Canada is a member of Save the Children International, a network of 30 member organizations that operate programs and raise funds both domestically and internationally. The members of this network join together as a federation to pool resources, establish common positions on issues and strengthen our capacities to carry out life-saving and sustainable projects.

Save the Children International is the world’s leading independent organization for children. We strive to give children an environment in which their human rights and needs are respected and protected, so they can realize their fullest potential. To achieve this, our programs focus on child rights and protection, health and nutrition, clean water, education, sustainable livelihoods, emergency relief and survival.

Rights of the Child

We are committed to ensuring children realize the rights to which they are entitled under the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. This Convention forms the basis of all of our work in Canada and around the world.

Simply put:

  • All children have the right to survival, protection, development and participation
  • All children have the right to be protected from manipulation, violence, abuse and exploitation
  • Children have the right to be listened to, to freely express their views on all matters that affect them, and to freedom of expression, thought, association, and access to information
  • Measures should be put in place to encourage and facilitate children’s participation in accordance with their age and maturity
  • Participation should promote the best interests of the child and enhance their personal development
  • All children have equal rights to participate without discrimination

Our History

Our organization has been leading the world to a better understanding of children’s rights for almost 100 years. We help children during warfare and violent conflicts, in the aftermath of natural disasters, and in situations of extreme poverty and social injustice. Click on the timeline below to learn about our history and the difference that our supporters have made for millions of children over time.

1919

Eglantyne Jebb established the Save the Children Fund to feed children facing starvation after the First World War.

1921

Save the Children Fund was formed in Canada. The Canadian Committee's first objective was to help provide relief for six million Russian children suffering the effects of malnutrition and famine. Hundreds of Canadians generously embraced the Russian famine relief campaign.

1924

The League of Nations adopted Eglantyne’s charter on children’s rights.

1930s

Despite the depression, the Canadian Committee continued to send aid to children in China, Czechoslovakia and Spain.

1939-1945

During the Second World War, we worked to safeguard children directly affected by the war. We continue to do this in conflict-affected regions.

Post-Second World War

Canadian Save the Children Fund undertook a massive program to provide food, clothing, medical supplies and cash to children in France, Greece and Italy.

1946

The Canadian Save the Children Fund charter was granted—the first completely independent Commonwealth branch of Save the Children Fund.

1970s

Save the Children Canada grows to 67 branches across Canada.

1977

A number of Save the Children organizations formed an alliance to coordinate work to improve outcomes for the world’s children, sowing the seeds for Save the Children as a single global movement for children.

1989

The United Nations General Assembly adopted the Convention on the Rights of the Child. 194 countries have signed this legally binding convention.

2004-2009

Save the Children launched its largest humanitarian operation, in response to the Indian Ocean tsunami. Our tsunami response program received funding of US$272 million, largely through generous donations.

2009

Save the Children launched EVERY ONE, our largest-ever global campaign, to prevent millions of mothers and young children from dying.

Today

In 2014, we reached 55 million children in over 120 countries, including Canada.